30 Dying Professions to Avoid Like a Plague

30 Dying Professions to Avoid Like a Plague

In this article, we will look at the 30 dying professions to avoid like a plague. We have also discussed the need for skill building and companies at the forefront of upskilling. If you want to skip our detailed analysis, head straight to the 10 Dying Professions to Avoid Like a Plague. Owing to the digital age we live in, there are several jobs that don’t exist anymore. For example, lamplighters, who once lit gas lamps on city streets, have been replaced by electrical lighting. With digital media dominating, film projectionists have also become rare. The story is the same for typesetters in the print industry. Then there are jobs that are slowly dying, like administrative assistants, as virtual assistants have largely replaced them. On the other hand, there are jobs that will never disappear, like healthcare professionals such as doctors and nurses. As time evolves, our needs also evolve; hence, the demands for jobs vary from time to time. Decrease in Job Openings and Remote JobsIn July 2023, the US labor market was slowed as job openings declined by 338,000, the lowest level in nearly 2 1/2 years. This decrease was especially pronounced in the professional and business services sector, which saw a drop of 198,000 job openings. The healthcare and social assistance sector also had 130,000 fewer vacancies, and state and local government job openings (excluding education) fell by 67,000. Meanwhile, the number of people quitting their jobs dropped to levels last seen in early 2021. On the other hand, the landscape of remote jobs is also evolving, with some positions facing the risk of disappearing in the coming years. At the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly half of Americans worked from home, but this has now declined to less than 10% of the workforce, which reflects a shift in employer attitudes, as noted by CNBC. Some remote roles may not exist in the future, particularly those that can be outsourced to cheaper overseas workers or automated by AI. Companies are finding it more cost-efficient to move certain jobs, such as customer service and receptionist roles, to countries with lower labor costs. Story continuesFurthermore, industries prioritizing in-person interactions, like retail and manufacturing, will likely continue limiting remote work opportunities. In contrast, remote jobs that require specialized skills, little to no social interaction, and can’t be easily replaced by cheaper labor or AI, such as financial analysts and finance directors, are expected to remain in demand. To read more about remote jobs, see best work-from-home jobs for 2023. A four-year college degree alone is only convincing once combined with hands-on experience or hard skills. This explains why skills like coding, data analysis, and digital marketing have been in high demand. However, soft skills like adaptability, communication, and critical thinking cannot be overstated as they complement technical expertise. To read more about those, check our article about skills employers look for in candidates.Time to Upskill: How are the Giants Helping?In 2020, Microsoft Corp (NASDAQ:MSFT) launched a global initiative to equip 25 million people worldwide with essential digital skills by the end of that year. This effort hinged on three core components: data-driven identification of in-demand jobs, free access to learning materials via LinkedIn, GitHub, and Microsoft Corp (NASDAQ:MSFT) platforms, and affordable certifications and job-seeking tools. Microsoft Corp (NASDAQ:MSFT) committed $20 million in cash grants to support nonprofits, with a large portion directed toward community-based organizations serving underrepresented communities in the United States. Moreover, Microsoft Corp (NASDAQ:MSFT) has recently pledged to train one million people in the United Kingdom by 2025 in AI skills. It aims to prepare them for the evolving job market dominated by artificial intelligence. The commitment expands the Get On program, which has already trained over one million people, contributing to 30,000 tech industry careers. With a focus on AI fluency, technical skills, and business support for AI transformation, Microsoft Corp (NASDAQ:MSFT) aims to address the concerns of 54% of UK business leaders who worry about their workforce’s lack of AI skills. The efforts for upskilling are not limited to just US or UK; Microsoft Corp (NASDAQ:MSFT) has announced a major AUD5 billion (USD$3.18 billion) investment in Australia. This investment aims to expand Microsoft Corp (NASDAQ:MSFT)’s presence in the country, particularly in cybersecurity and artificial intelligence. On the other hand, Alphabet Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG) has announced its plans to train 20,000 Nigerian women and youth in digital skills and provide a grant of 1.2 billion naira (equivalent to $1.6 million) to support the Nigerian government’s efforts to create one million digital jobs in the country. The initiative will be facilitated by a grant from Alphabet Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG)’s philanthropic arm, in collaboration with Data Science Nigeria and the Creative Industry Initiative for Africa. Alphabet Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG) aims to empower women and young people in Nigeria with digital skills, as well as support startups to foster job creation. Alphabet Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG) also offers online professional certificate programs through Coursera Inc (NYSE:COUR), making tech careers more accessible. These programs cover different tech fields, like digital marketing, data analytics, UX design, project management, IT support, and IT automation with Python. Alphabet Inc (NASDAQ:GOOG)’s courses are structured to simplify complex material and make the content suitable for those without prior tech knowledge or a degree. While these certificates don’t always equate to a graduate degree, they provide valuable skills for LinkedIn profiles or career transition. This high accessibility has reduced barriers to entry in tech roles and careers for people with nontechnical backgrounds like social sciences.30 Dying Professions to Avoid Like a PlagueA worker operating a machine that produces round bars. Editorial photo for a financial news article. 8k. –ar 16:9MethodologyTo list the dying professions to avoid like a plague, we have listed the jobs based on growth rates. We acquired data on the fastest-declining occupations from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The idea is that the fastest declining occupations are risky choices as they often signify obsolescence owing to technological developments or changing market demands. Hence, pursuing such careers can lead to job insecurity, limited opportunities for growth, and potential unemployment. It’s essential to opt for fields with growth potential to ensure a more stable and prosperous professional future, like the most in-demand jobs for the future. Here is a list of the worst jobs in the future. 30. File ClerksEmployment Change: -16.0%File clerks are responsible for organizing and maintaining physical and digital records within an organization29. Print Binding and Finishing WorkersEmployment Change: -16.4%With the rise of digital media and online content, there is less need for traditional printed materials. Many print jobs have been automated, reducing manual labor in binding and finishing. 28. Payroll and Timekeeping ClerksEmployment Change: -16.4%Automated systems are far more efficient and accurate in managing employee records and payroll and have largely replaced manual data entry and calculations.27. Structural Metal Fabrications and FittersEmployment Change: -16.4%Structural metal fabricators and fitters work in the manufacturing and construction industries. They are responsible for crafting, assembling, and fitting metal components and structures. 26. Coil Winders, Tapers, and FinishersEmployment Change: -16.6%Automation and the relocation of manufacturing processes to lower-wage countries have contributed to declining jobs for coil winders, tapers, and finishers. It is one of the dying professions everyone should avoid. 25. Prepress Technicians and WorkersEmployment Change: -17.1%Traditional prepress tasks, such as typesetting and film processing, have become obsolete with the rise of digital publishing and printing.24. Loading and Moving Machine Operators, Underground MiningEmployment Change: -17.7%Loading and moving machine operators in underground mining operate heavy machinery to transport materials, ore, or equipment within mines. 23. Electronic Equipment Installers and Repairers, Motor VehiclesEmployment Change: -18.0%Owing to the increasing complexity of modern vehicles and their integrated electronic systems, many of these systems have become highly specialized, requiring the expertise of automotive technicians rather than separate installers and repairers. 22. Floral DesignersEmployment Change: -18.0%The decline in this job is largely attributed to the shift in consumer preferences, as many consumers now opt for pre-made floral arrangements and online ordering. It is among the most notable of jobs that are fading away. 21. Order ClerksEmployment Change: -18.2%This job is declining due to order processing automation through e-commerce and electronic systems. Many companies now use advanced software and online platforms to handle orders.20. Drilling and Boring Machine Tool Setters, Operators, and Tenders, Metal and PlasticEmployment Change: -18.3%These professionals are responsible for setting up and operating drilling and boring machines to create holes in metal or plastic materials.19. Timing Device Assemblers and AdjustersEmployment Change: -18.7%The decline in this profession is linked to the widespread use of electronic devices for timekeeping, which have largely replaced traditional mechanical timepieces. 18. Model Makers, Metal and PlasticEmployment Change: -18.8%Model makers in metal and plastic create physical prototypes and models of different products, from consumer goods to industrial machinery. It is one of the dying professions to avoid like a plague.17. Engine and Other Machine AssemblersEmployment Change: -18.9%It has become one of the fastest declining occupations owing to the automation and the increasing complexity of machinery, which often requires advanced training and skills. 16. Grinding and Polishing Workers, HandEmployment Change: -19.5%Grinding and polishing workers are skilled laborers who manually grind, smooth, and polish materials like metal, glass, or stone using hand-held tools. 15. TelemarketersEmployment Change: -20.6%As consumers increasingly use digital platforms for shopping, the demand for telemarketers has waned. It is one of the dying professions everyone should avoid.14. Manufactured Building and Mobile Home InstallersEmployment Change: -21.0%The demand for traditional, site-built homes has been greater than that for manufactured homes in recent years. Modular construction and developments in home-building technology have also reduced the need for specialized installers.13. Executive Secretaries and Executive Administrative AssistantsEmployment Change: -21.1%Executives now handle many tasks using software and technology which has decreased the need for dedicated executive assistants. 12. Refractory Materials Repairers, except brick masonsEmployment Change: -21.4%Refractory materials repairers work with materials that can withstand high temperatures and are commonly used in industries such as steelmaking and manufacturing.11. Patternmakers, Metal and PlasticEmployment Change: -21.6%Patternmakers in metal and plastic craft templates or patterns used in manufacturing to create molds and casts. With job openings declining at a rate as high as -21.6%, it is one of the worst careers for the future. Click here to see the 10 Dying Professions to Avoid Like a Plague.Suggested Articles:Disclosure: None. 30 Dying Professions to Avoid Like a Plague is originally published on Insider Monkey.

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